PRESS RELEASES

  • Downtime: How baking taught Pearson India’s Vinay Swamy essential lessons in leadership

    Baking cakes is not just a way for Pearson India's Vinay Swamy to unwind and bond with his children. It has also taught him to plan ahead and manage his time better

    A qualified chartered accountant and a corporate finance leader, Vinay Swamy, Country Head of learning company Pearson India, keeps a busy schedule. Yet, he has figured out ways to keep himself focussed and pumped up through the work week by spending his ‘me time’ doing something that delights him. For starters, he spends his mornings relaxing in his terrace garden. And every other week, he indulges himself by baking cakes.

    Baking, he says, helps him to unwind, connect with his family, and create memories with them. For this baking enthusiast, the journey started in 2014, when he decided to turn his love of baking into a meaningful pursuit. And for that, he enrolled in a certification course at the Bengaluru-based Institute of Baking & Cake Art. “This allowed me to bake a strawberry cake for my mother-in-law’s 60th birthday. It’s been 10 years now, and she still recalls it as one of the best cakes she has ever had,” Swamy says with a smile.

    The Pearson India boss says his ardour for baking has also played a pivotal role in his parenting journey. He recalls how he began baking delectable chocolate cakes nearly every week for his wife when his younger daughter Maanya was on the way. “This not only heightened my love for baking, but it also became a medium to craft some of my most cherished memories,” he says, adding that now, every moment spent baking with his children is a treasure for him. Not only do these baking sessions bring them closer, he says, but they also give him an opportunity to impart vital life skills to his children. For him, it’s a fun way of forging connections and cultivating endearing memories, and at the same time sharing in the sheer delight of baking a delicious cake.

    Swamy says that the true joy of baking is not just in the end product, but in the process of making a cake. It’s a meticulous process that requires careful planning and foresight, which Swamy says, has helped him organise his life better.

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  • Only in Bengaluru? Vending machine for books on economy, marketing offers UPI payment

    The Pearson vending machine was equipped with a 'Prepare Well' hashtag painted on it.

    A vending machine for books, equipped with UPI payment options, has been sighted in Bengaluru and shared on social media branded as a “peak Bengaluru” moment.

    The photograph shared by X user Ramanan (@Ramanan) shows the Pearson vending machine offering a curated selection of books spanning subjects such as Indian economy, marketing, UGC, and machine learning. The user tagged the X handle of Peak Bengaluru, that is known for sharing viral ‘only in Bengaluru’ moments.

    Bengaluru, known as the Silicon Valley of India, continues to surprise with innovative solutions. The vending machine equipped with a “Prepare Well” hashtag painted on the machine also hints at the high pressure of Indian students prepping for competitive examinations.

    The X user who shared the snapshot, expressed his amazement with a tweet that read, "Vending machine for books with UPI payment @peakbengaluru moment."

    Vending machines traditionally dispense snacks, chips, candy, drinks and other readymade snacks in exchange of cash. With technology, UPI payments are also a mode of payment for people using the vending machines. However, vending machines selling books have not been too common especially in India.

    About Pearson

    At Pearson, our purpose is simple: to add life to a lifetime of learning. We believe that every learning opportunity is a chance for a personal breakthrough. That’s why our c.20,000 Pearson employees are committed to creating vibrant and enriching learning experiences designed for real-life impact. We are the world’s leading learning company, serving customers in nearly 200 countries with digital content, assessments, qualifications, and data. For us, learning isn’t just what we do. It’s who we are.

    Visit us at: www.pearsonplc.com

    For more information, please contact: Bhavya Suri, PR & Corporate Affairs, Pearson India & MENA- bhavya.suri@pearson.com

    Read More / Money Control

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  • Pearson partner with Solitaire to offer Higher Nationals programs in Business Management

    Hyderabad, February 26 (UNI) Pearson, the world’s leading learning company, on Monday announced its partnership with Solitaire Business School, a premier educational institution in Hyderabad, to offer Pearson’s BTEC Higher Nationals programmes in Business Management and courses in Sport, Fitness Instructing and Personal Training, Marketing and Business. Pearson BTECs are vocational skill qualification programs, developed in consultation with industry experts, educators and employers offering a diverse range of qualifications across different industries and sectors, the company said in a release here.

    The qualifications are internationally recognised providing progression to both university and employment, where real-life scenarios are used for assignments and assessments.

    They are offered at 30 plus partners in India, including universities, colleges, international schools, and private training centres. The qualifications are offered in over 24 subject areas with more than 2000 qualifications ranging from business to digital technology to art and design to healthcare and many more, enabling learners with skills relevant to the global workplace. On the announcement of the partnership, Mir Murtuza Ali, Chairperson of Solitaire Business School, said, “Their curriculum materials, platforms, and assessments are widely respected and used by leading institutions worldwide. With Pearson’s expertise and Solitaire Business Schools’ unwavering commitment to student success, I’m confident this collaboration will open doors to exciting global opportunities for us.” On the partnership, Daniyal Ali, Director of Solitaire Business School, said, “ Through this collaboration, we at Solitaire Business Schools aim to ensure our students are always adaptive to the changing landscape and have the necessary skills for the future of work.” “Our collaboration with the Solitaire Business School represents our alignment with India’s National Education Policy 2020, wherein the Indian government aims to expand vocational education to at least 50 percent of learners in the school and higher education system by 2025. Through this partnership, we will provide vocational training and skill development programs that are relevant to the evolving job market for learners.”

    Siddharth Parnerkar, International Sales Director, Pearson. Recently, Pearson also collaborated with the National Skill Development Corporation International (NSDCI) to address the urgent need for upskilling and workforce development in India.

    Read More / UNI India

    About Pearson

    At Pearson, our purpose is simple: to add life to a lifetime of learning. We believe that every learning opportunity is a chance for a personal breakthrough. That’s why our c.20,000 Pearson employees are committed to creating vibrant and enriching learning experiences designed for real-life impact. We are the world’s leading learning company, serving customers in nearly 200 countries with digital content, assessments, qualifications, and data. For us, learning isn’t just what we do. It’s who we are.

    Visit us at: www.pearsonplc.com

    For more information, please contact: Bhavya Suri, PR & Corporate Affairs, Pearson India & MENA- bhavya.suri@pearson.com

    Read More/Pearson BTEC

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  • Pearson partners with University Living; aims to support Indian students’ global education journey

    University Living claims to offer two million beds in 65,000 properties across 515 international education hubs spanning the UK, Ireland, USA, Canada, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore and UAE.

    Pearson, a global education company, has partnered with University Living (UL), an online marketplace for student accommodations worldwide, aimed at assisting study-abroad aspirants in India with foreign accommodation, financial services, and logistical support. This collaboration aims to provide exclusive discounts, benefits and support services tailored to facilitate the global mobility of Indian students taking the PTE test, according to an official release.

    Through this alliance, Pearson and University Living aims to host webinars, seminars and campus visits to offer valuable insights and guidance to aspiring learners. Additionally, they will introduce destination-specific promotions on accommodation and educational packages targeting key markets such as Canada, the UK, Australia and New Zealand, the release mentioned.

    “Our collaboration with Pearson is a step further in this direction to support the outbound student community in their academic pursuits across borders majorly in Australia and Canada. We stand committed in our endeavour to provide the students with safe spaces where they can give shape to their academic and professional aspirations,” Saurabh Arora, founder and CEO, University Living, said.

    University Living claims to offer two million beds in 65,000 properties across 515 international education hubs spanning the UK, Ireland, USA, Canada, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore and UAE. 

    “Our collaboration with University Living is aimed to empower these students by simplifying and streamlining the entire process. Together, we will help the students to focus on their preparation for PTE, without the distraction and anxiety about accommodation and financial support,” Prabhul Ravindran, director of English language learning, Pearson India, said.

    About Pearson

    At Pearson, our purpose is simple: to add life to a lifetime of learning. We believe that every learning opportunity is a chance for a personal breakthrough. That’s why our c.20,000 Pearson employees are committed to creating vibrant and enriching learning experiences designed for real-life impact. We are the world’s leading learning company, serving customers in nearly 200 countries with digital content, assessments, qualifications, and data. For us, learning isn’t just what we do. It’s who we are.

    Visit us at: www.pearsonplc.com

    For more information, please contact: Bhavya Suri, PR & Corporate Affairs, Pearson India & MENA- bhavya.suri@pearson.com

    Read More / The Financial Express

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  • Migration has always been an important part of India’s history: Upinder Singh

    ‘A history of ancient and early medieval India’ (Pearson), as Singh explains, was written keeping in mind general readers who are interested in getting an in-depth understanding of ancient India and students of history.

    The first edition of this book was published by Pearson almost 15 years ago in 2008. Almost 15 years after historian Upinder Singh published her comprehensive study of ancient and early medieval India, she has come out with a second edition of her book. ‘A history of ancient and early medieval India’ (Pearson), as Singh explains, was written keeping in mind general readers who are interested in getting an in-depth understanding of ancient India and students of history. Her book is celebrated for introducing budding historians to primary sources, historical methodologies and concepts in a thoroughly detailed and comprehensible manner. In her second edition, also published by Pearson, she keeps her original thoughts intact while adding newer research such as that on the history of less explored parts of the subcontinent like the Northeast and Kashmir, and the global networks that connected ancient India to the rest of the world.

    1. What have you done differently in the second edition of ‘A history of ancient and early medieval India?’

    The first edition of this book was published by Pearson almost 15 years ago in 2008. I had some specific aims in mind when I wrote it. I wanted to integrate archaeology and history, to include subordinated groups in social history, to give due importance to religion and philosophy, and to highlight the intellectual and aesthetic domains. I felt that books on ancient India did not have to be boring. There was a wonderful world of primary sources, including literature and art, that readers should be exposed to, and it was important to explain that none of these sources could be interpreted in a simplistic way. I wanted my book to be balanced but also forward my perspective. At the same time, I wanted to create a window for questioning, so that readers could approach debates with an open mind, and develop an ability to critically evaluate evidence and arguments. Historical inquiry is after all an on-going process and there can never be a last word.

    I still feel strongly about all these things and they are reflected in the second edition also published by Pearson. But over the years, my perspectives and interests have expanded. I have become interested in the history of ideas, the interactions between the state and the forest people, the connections between art and history, and the subcontinent’s connections with other parts of the world. I have incorporated these interests into the second edition, so it is significantly different from the first. Also, of course, there has been a great deal of new work produced by other scholars on many aspects of ancient India, which I have gained from and cited. I wanted to especially draw attention to the work of the younger generation of historians on whom we depend to expand our understanding of ancient India in the future.

    This edition contains a more detailed treatment of the history of science and mathematics. Certain regions of the subcontinent tend to get neglected in the history books, so I have included more material on Kashmir and the Northeast. This is actually a book on the early history of South Asia, so there is also more on the regions of South Asia beyond the modern boundaries of India, namely Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, and Sri Lanka. When I set out to work on the second edition, I was aware that a lot of updating would be needed. It surprised me that some sections did not need any rewriting. But a lot of new details needed to be added. For instance, the discoveries at the stone age site of Attirampakkam (in Tamil Nadu), early rice at Lahuradeva (in Uttar Pradesh), and early Tamil-Brahmi writing at Kodumanal (in Tamil Nadu). I had to completely rewrite Chapter 7 which is about the Maurya period. When I wrote the first edition, I was of course aware that the Arthashastra is not generally considered a work of the Maurya period any more, and that it is a theoretical treatise on statecraft. But I still included it in the chapter on the Maurya empire. This time around, I discussed it in Chapter 8 (which deals with the period c. 200 BCE-300 CE), as a brilliant and influential work on statecraft and political ideas. In the last chapter of the book, which is on the early medieval period, I expanded the discussion of Islam, the Arabs and Turks, and how international trade led to the growth of multi-cultural and multi-religious communities on the western coast.

    2. In your preface you say that you have tried to view the Indian subcontinent as part of an intricate network of interaction with other parts of the world. Could you please elaborate?

    These interactions included war, trade, diplomacy, religious networks, and the circulation of ideas. Everyone knows about the Persian and Macedonian invasions of the northwest. But we don’t think enough about the centuries of invasions that took place between c. 200 BCE and 300 CE, between the end of the Maurya dynasty and the emergence of the Gupta empire. These are the invasions of the Bactrian Greeks, Shakas, Parthians and Kushanas. The political developments in north India during this period were closely connected with political developments in Central Asia and China. Even though the Shaka era is still used in India, the Shakas are very understudied. Archaeology has contributed a great deal to the understanding of trade interactions, especially across the Indian Ocean. Take, for example, the discoveries of hundreds of inscriptions and drawings on Hoq Cave in Socotra, a small island off the course of Yemen. A shipwreck found off the coast of Godawaya in Southern Sri Lanka, is the oldest shipwreck known in South Asia. Tamil-Brahmi inscriptions have been found at the ports of Berenike and Quseiral-Qadim on the Red Sea coast. Whether or not Pattanam is the ancient Muziris of Graeco-Roman accounts, this site in Kerala gives exciting evidence of flourishing trade with the Mediterranean, north Afghanistan, west Asia, and China.

    The story of interactions is not only about trade. There are lots of tantalizing pieces in the puzzle, for instance, the ivory statuette representing the goddess Lakshmi or a yakshi found in Pompeii in Italy, the Buddha statue found at Berenike in Egypt, and the bronze statuette of the Roman sea god Poseidon found at Brahmapuri in Maharashtra.

    Migration has always been an important part of the history of the Indian subcontinent, with people constantly coming in and going out. Quanzhou in China yielded over 300 Hindu images and artefacts, and a bilingual Tamil–Chinese inscription. This suggests the presence of a colony of Tamil merchants, perhaps members of a guild, in the 13th/14th century. There are references to Brahmin physicians and astrologers in Chinese courts. The spread of Sanskrit texts and Vedic rituals to Southeast Asia also presumes Brahmin migrations.

    There was also rivalry, conflict and war. In the 11th century, the Cholas and Srivijayans sent diplomatic missions to the Song court in China. In a masterstroke of diplomacy, the Shrivijayans seem to have convinced the Chinese that the Cholas were the Shrivijayans’ subordinates! The subsequent Chola expedition to Srivijaya shows the connections between trade interests and war. It is a unique instance when an ancient Indian political power launched a trans-oceanic military operation.

    The evolving religious networks are evident in the spread of Buddhism across Asia and the spread of Hinduism to Southeast Asia. We know about land grants made by kings of the subcontinent, but some Southeast Asian rulers also made religious grants in India. In recent years, looking at ancient India’s connections with Southeast Asia has become fashionable, but we seem to have regressed to the earlier ‘Greater India’ perspective which is obsessed with India’s influence on the world. I see India as part of a wider world we need to learn more about, as a centre of both influence and confluence. I hope that a young generation of scholars will develop the linguistic and other skills to contribute meaningfully to the production of knowledge about India–Southeast Asia relations. We also need young scholars who can focus on the intellectual exchanges between India and East Asia. This will involve a lot of training and hard work. But it will unveil exciting stories not only about connections, but also cultural specificity and difference. It will also open up the exciting field of the comparative study of ideas.

    3. You have included a section on new scientific techniques used in archaeology. How would you say that these new techniques have enhanced our understanding of ancient India?

    The amount of data produced by archaeology is likely to grow faster than that of other sources. Archaeological methods, including scientific dating methods are extremely important. Remote sensing techniques make it possible to study sites without invasive and expensive excavations. For instance, B. M. Rajani’s work on Nalanda has identified structures that are not visible above the ground. Another important example of the application of science to archaeology is the study by Kalyan Sekhar Chakraborty and others of animal bones and lipid profiles in pottery fragments at the site of Kotada Bhadli in Gujarat, which brings out the importance of dairy farming for the Harappans. Genome analysis is now an important part of the debate on the Indo-Europeans and Indo-Aryans. The genome study of a woman’s skeleton found at Rakhigarhi is important, but we need a much larger sampling and many more studies of ancient DNA. In the future, I am sure that genome analysis will add substantially to our understanding of the migrations and mixtures of populations across different parts of the world.

    4. In the polarised world of today, how would you want budding historians to read and reflect upon ancient Indian history?

    My book is simultaneously aimed at two audiences — general readers and students, basically anyone who is interested in an in-depth understanding of ancient and early medieval India. For both audiences, I think that balance is very important. I would like young students to understand that history is an exciting discipline based on a rigorous analysis and interpretation of sources and logical and creative reasoning. Budding historians should work hard to develop the linguistic or archaeological skills they need to interpret their sources. I also think that young Indian historians should broaden their horizons beyond India to explore the histories of other parts of the world. Historians are bound to look at the past through the eyes of their present, but readers must understand that all hypotheses are not equally valid. They must recognize the difference between historical interpretations that are based on sound analysis and argument, and those that are not. But this cannot happen unless historians clearly explain their methods and debates to non-specialists, especially students. I have tried to do that in my book.

    I am aware that these days, a lot of stuff claiming to be history is circulating on the internet; a great deal of it is not sound history. Readers of books and consumers of internet material need to be able to distinguish between history and pseudo-history and propaganda. They should beware of simple stories of heroes and villains. History is complex and our past consists of many different strands. As I have pointed out in my book, Ancient India: Culture of Contradictions, understanding history requires abandoning simplistic stereotypes and preconceived notions; it requires a sensitivity to the nuances and complexities of the subject. I strongly believe that students should resist following any particular ‘line.’ They should resist becoming camp followers of whichever group happens to be powerful or influential at a particular time. They should critique existing views independently and fearlessly, ask new questions, find their own answers, and strike their own path.

    5. What would you say has been the most challenging part about writing a textbook on ancient Indian history?

    As it is not possible to include everything in a single volume, I had to make judicious choices about what to include and what to leave out. Maintaining a balance while conveying a perspective was very challenging. Another challenging part (and the most enjoyable) was to find ways of igniting interest. You cannot inspire interest if your book is boring. I tried to enliven my book through excerpts from primary sources, visuals, and discussions of new research, especially the research of young scholars. A larger aim of my book is to inspire young people to read and think beyond the book, to get interested in exploring neglected and new areas.

    6. Is there any aspect of ancient Indian history that you think is yet to be adequately researched and written about by historians?

    There are so many aspects of ancient Indian history that need more research. Archaeology is likely to add substantially to our knowledge about the Indian past. I think we need much more work on the archaeology of the early medieval period. We need much more work on the history of ideas. There are regions of the subcontinent such as the northeast that are very under-represented in history books. Sri Lanka is a small but very important island from the point of view of trade and religious networks. In fact, the history of ancient India has to be seen in larger global context. There are so many different kinds of connections with China, Central Asia, Southeast Asia, Europe and Africa. We haven’t even reached the tip of the iceberg in studying these connections.

    About Pearson

    At Pearson, our purpose is simple: to add life to a lifetime of learning. We believe that every learning opportunity is a chance for a personal breakthrough. That’s why our c.20,000 Pearson employees are committed to creating vibrant and enriching learning experiences designed for real-life impact. We are the world’s leading learning company, serving customers in nearly 200 countries with digital content, assessments, qualifications, and data. For us, learning isn’t just what we do. It’s who we are.

    Visit us at: www.pearsonplc.com

    For more information, please contact: Bhavya Suri, PR & Corporate Affairs, Pearson India & MENA- bhavya.suri@pearson.com

    Read More / The Indian Express

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  • Canada PR aspirants now have a new option to test their English proficiency

    “Pearson has introduced PTE Core, a new English language proficiency test approved by Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada (IRCC). The test is tailored for vocational purposes and can be used to demonstrate English proficiency for Canadian PR or citizenship. It assesses speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills and is available for booking starting February 12.

    Indians applying for Canadian PR or Canadian citizenship now have a new choice of test for English proficiency. Pearson has opened bookings for PTE Core, its latest English language proficiency test. Approved by Immigration, Refugees, and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) last year, PTE Core can now be used to demonstrate English language proficiency for permanent economic immigration to Canada or Canadian citizenship, with tests starting from February 12.

    PTE Core, an addition to the Pearson Test of English portfolio, shares distinctive features with PTE Academic. It is a two-hour, computer-based exam conducted in a test center setting, assessing four key English language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

    PTE Core is tailored for vocational test-takers, offering a real-life, non-academic focus. Developed to meet Canada's specific migration requirements and IRCC's language proficiency standards, it can be used to assess English proficiency for vocational purposes in any country.

    “We are excited to roll out PTE Core to test takers in India and help the test takers to achieve their dreams of living and working in Canada. PTE Core is a new test from Pearson, designed to offer a vocational and real-life focus to support the Canadian Government’s migration needs. This is an important step for Pearson, boosting our aim to become the global leader in English language for committed learners,” Prabhul Ravindran, Director of English Language Learning, Pearson India, said.

    With Canada's focus on economic recovery and growth post-pandemic, IRCC is expanding its Levels Plan to address increasing demand. PTE Core's approval comes at an opportune time, providing new possibilities for test-takers, especially in professions like nursing, engineering, and web development.

    PTE Core addresses Canadian economic migration needs, complementing PTE Academic, accepted by IRCC since August 2023 for Student Direct Stream (SDS) visa applications. PTE Academic is already recognized by over 97% of universities and 95% of colleges in Canada, as well as governments in the UK, Australia, and New Zealand. PTE Academic is also widely accepted by universities in Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, and 99% of UK universities.

    Delivered through Pearson VUE, the fully digital PTE Core test utilizes cutting-edge AI technology, reviewed by human raters, for scoring. Enhanced security measures, including biometric data collection, ensure a fair and precise evaluation of English language proficiency. Test-takers can book PTE Core online up to 24 hours in advance, benefit from year-round test slots worldwide, and receive results, on average, within two days.

    PTE Core will be introduced across Pearson's global network, spanning over 400 PTE centers in 118 countries, including 25 test centers in Canada.

    About Pearson

    At Pearson, our purpose is simple: to add life to a lifetime of learning. We believe that every learning opportunity is a chance for a personal breakthrough. That’s why our c.20,000 Pearson employees are committed to creating vibrant and enriching learning experiences designed for real-life impact. We are the world’s leading learning company, serving customers in nearly 200 countries with digital content, assessments, qualifications, and data. For us, learning isn’t just what we do. It’s who we are.

    Visit us at: www.pearsonplc.com

    For more information, please contact: Bhavya Suri, PR & Corporate Affairs, Pearson India & MENA- bhavya.suri@pearson.com

    Read More / The Economic Times

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  • Generative AI can have a positive impact on teaching and learning, says senior Pearson executive

    “Pearson is betting big on generative AI in education, leveraging India's talent pool for R&D. The company has technology development centres in Bengaluru and Chennai. Pearson aims to enhance the teaching and learning experience through AI integration in its global products.”

     

    Generative AI is taking giant strides across industries, including education. Pearson is also looking to bet big on it. India is a pivotal hub for innovation and product development for Pearson, playing a critical role in the company’s global research and development (R&D) roadmap, said a senior executive.

    “The country has a vast talent pool specialising in education, technology, and content creation, providing us with a valuable resource for developing localised content, enhancing digital products, and driving innovation,” said Marykay Wells, CIO, Pearson.

    The company has set up technology development centres in Bengaluru and Chennai that create global products. Talking about Generative AI, Wells said, Generative AI can have a positive impact on teaching and learning, and eventually how the company serves its customers.

    “This is a significant positive opportunity for Pearson.We have embedded AI across our key products in a way that enhances the teaching and learning experience and improves lives. The structures, methods, and pedagogy behind our IP make it unique in the market. We have proprietary AI data sets [numbers, sequences, algorithms] that are creating rich learning experiences, delivered through PTE, Mondly and Credly,” she said.

    Organisations have become the new centers of learning, Wells said, where working professionals embark on their upskilling journeys. “Enterprise learning is a big opportunity for us. We are developing our portfolio to meet the requirements of professionals who are now “learning as they earn” and employers who want to get the best out of their people,” she said.

    Enterprise products and services comprise about 20% of global revenue across the company, primarily through its certification business in Pearson VUE.

    About Pearson

    At Pearson, our purpose is simple: to add life to a lifetime of learning. We believe that every learning opportunity is a chance for a personal breakthrough. That’s why our c.20,000 Pearson employees are committed to creating vibrant and enriching learning experiences designed for real-life impact. We are the world’s leading learning company, serving customers in nearly 200 countries with digital content, assessments, qualifications, and data. For us, learning isn’t just what we do. It’s who we are.

    Visit us at: www.pearsonplc.com

    For more information, please contact: Bhavya Suri, PR & Corporate Affairs, Pearson India & MENA- bhavya.suri@pearson.com

    Read More / The Times of India

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  • Pearson India Launches The Second Edition Of ‘A History Of Ancient And Early Medieval India’ By Prof. Upinder Singh

    Pearson India recently launched the second edition of the book; ‘A History of Ancient and Early Medieval India’ authored by Prof. Upinder Singh, one of the most renowned Indian historians and professors. The official launch event was held in Delhi, attended by Prof. Rudrangshu Mukherjee, Historian & Chancellor of Ashoka University, Vinay Kumar Swamy, Country Head-Pearson India, amongst many other eminent dignitaries, authors, academicians, and educators.

    On the occasion, the author, Prof. Upinder Singh, said, “Over the years, my perspectives and interests have expanded. I have become interested in the history of ideas, the interactions between the state and the forest people, the connections between art and history, and the subcontinent’s connections with other parts of the world. I have incorporated these interests into the second edition, so it is significantly different from the first. Also, of course, there has been a great deal of new work produced by other scholars on many aspects of ancient India, which I have gained from and cited. I wanted to especially draw attention to the work of the younger generation of historians on whom we depend on to expand our understanding of ancient India in the future.”

    Commenting on the launch, Vinay Kumar Swamy, Country Head, Pearson India, said, “As we unveil the second edition of this widely acclaimed book, we remain committed to enabling lifelong learning journeys for everyone. We believe that the new edition will provide a relevant understanding of various historical concepts and theories in a much better and more effective way.”

    This new edition of the book highlights discoveries and historiographical trends by referring to the latest scientific techniques used in archaeology. The book also includes crucial discussions of ecology, forest tribes, and pastoralists, while emphasizing the experiences of subordinated classes, castes, and women. This edition also expands coverage of South Asia beyond India, outlining the multiple networks that connected India to the world.

    The first edition of the book was published in 2008, to integrate archaeology and history, to include subordinated groups in social history, to give due importance to religion and philosophy, and to highlight the intellectual and aesthetic domains. Both editions of the book, aspire to create a window for questioning so that readers can approach debates with an open mind, and develop an ability to critically evaluate evidence and arguments.

    About Pearson

    At Pearson, our purpose is simple: to add life to a lifetime of learning. We believe that every learning opportunity is a chance for a personal breakthrough. That’s why our c.20,000 Pearson employees are committed to creating vibrant and enriching learning experiences designed for real-life impact. We are the world’s leading learning company, serving customers in nearly 200 countries with digital content, assessments, qualifications, and data. For us, learning isn’t just what we do. It’s who we are.

    Visit us at: www.pearsonplc.com

    For more information, please contact: Bhavya Suri, PR & Corporate Affairs, Pearson India & MENA- bhavya.suri@pearson.com

    Read More / India Education Diary

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  • Pearson BTEC partners with Buddha Group of Institutions to empower students with in-campus career skills programmes

    Further, the platform claims to have more than 30 partners in India, including universities, colleges, international schools, and private training centres.

     

    Pearson, a learning company, partnered with Buddha Group of Institutions, to offer Pearson’s BTEC courses to students. The partnership will introduce BTEC Higher Nationals (HN) Art and Design and Business Management courses at the Buddha Group of Institutions, as per the official announcement.

    Pearson BTECs are vocational skill qualification programmes, developed in consultation with industry experts, offering a diverse range of qualifications across different industries and sectors, it added.

    Pearson’s BTEC claims that its higher education qualifications are equivalent to the first and second years of a university degree, where real-life scenarios are used for assessment and assignments.

    Further, the platform claims to have more than 30 partners in India, including universities, colleges, international schools and private training centres.

    Pearson BTEC claims to offer over 24 subject areas with more than 2000 qualifications ranging from business to digital technology to art and design to healthcare and many more, enabling learners with skills relevant for the global workplace.

    “Our partnership with BTEC will help our institute to provide students with options that match their career interests and aspirations.  It will also be helpful for us to attract a diverse student body and prepare them for a globalised workforce. The courses we have chosen to provide under the BTEC Programme include management, which will be instrumental in propelling the students towards a successful and fulfilling career in line with the ever-changing global demand, “Nitesh Gupta, director, Budha Group of Institutions, said.

    About Pearson

    At Pearson, our purpose is simple: to add life to a lifetime of learning. We believe that every learning opportunity is a chance for a personal breakthrough. That’s why our c.20,000 Pearson employees are committed to creating vibrant and enriching learning experiences designed for real-life impact. We are the world’s leading learning company, serving customers in nearly 200 countries with digital content, assessments, qualifications, and data. For us, learning isn’t just what we do. It’s who we are.

    Visit us at: www.pearsonplc.com

    For more information, please contact: Bhavya Suri, PR & Corporate Affairs, Pearson India & MENA- bhavya.suri@pearson.com

    Read More / The Financial Express

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  • Generative AI to replace 46% of time spent on accounting tasks in India; impact of AI on white vs blue-collar jobs

    In India, the job roles most affected are accounting and bookkeeping (46%), followed by word processors and related operators (40%).

    Pearson's latest 'Skills Outlook' series delved into the impact of generative AI on over 5,000 jobs across five countries: Australia, Brazil, India, the US, and the UK.

    Around 30% or more of the time dedicated to tasks within certain white-collar professions, such as accountants, bookkeeping clerks, word processor operators, administrative secretaries, and stall/market salespersons, could potentially be handled by generative AI.

    In contrast, less than 1% of the typical workload for blue-collar workers, including weavers, knitters, waiters, bakers/cooks, among others, might be feasibly taken over by generative AI during a workweek, according to a report by the learning company Pearson.

    Numerous administrative roles involve repetitive tasks—like scheduling appointments or managing calls—that are easily replicable by generative AI. This pattern is particularly noticeable in India, where the report underscores a significant 29% difference in the impact of tasks between the most affected white-collar and blue-collar jobs.

    In India, the job roles most affected are accounting and bookkeeping (46%), followed by word processors and related operators (40%).

    Mike Howells, President of Pearson Workforce Skills, highlighted, "As employees look to the future, understanding which jobs are at risk from AI allows them to prepare. They should also consider where new roles might be created by Gen AI. Workers and employers should look at how they can ride this wave of change by using the best of AI and the best of human skills together."

    The least affected jobs in India encompass working proprietors, directors, executives in transport and communication, and sales and marketing managers. Pearson's latest 'Skills Outlook' series delved into the impact of generative AI on over 5,000 jobs across five countries: Australia, Brazil, India, the US, and the UK.

    About Pearson

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    For more information, please contact: Bhavya Suri, PR & Corporate Affairs, Pearson India & MENA- bhavya.suri@pearson.com

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